Category: By the bug

"This material represents synthesis of styles trip-hop, synth-pop, electro-pop and ambient/downtempo", he said. "The album has turned out conceptual, it is devoted a theme of search of self-identification of the person in a modern society, to metaphysical search of the real name."



Category: By the bug

i ''borrowed'' this from the Last Train To Cool blog and to tell you the truth i haven't even
listened to it yet but that cover artwork is so absolutely fucking awesome that made me post it for the music it's Ron Carter and Billy Cobham ''arranging jazz music from Empire Strikes Back''..Hellyeah!!!


Heavy Fuckin' Metal

the undisputed truth

Category: By the bug


A very sweet little album by this great Motown group! The record was produced by Norman Whitfield, and it's a perfect example of the rumbling funky soul sound that he was developing at the time -- a mixture of heavy bass, rumbling percussion, fuzzy guitars, and a stone righteous sound that pushed soul music firmly into the 70s! The songs are mostly all originals written by him and Barrett Strong -- and the band is filled with great players like Dennis Coffey, Earl Van Dyke, Johnny Griffith, and the great Melvin "Wah Wah" Ragin. Titles include "Ungena Za Ulimwengu (Unite The World) Friendship Train", "What It Is?", "Don't Let Him Take Your Love From Me", "What's Going On", and "You Make Your Own Heaven & Hell Right Here On Earth".

αυτο το "you make your own heaven & hell right here on earth" τι επος που ειναι!!!


Category: By the bug

Willie Dixon was a prolific blues songwriter with more than 500 compositions to his credit. Born and raised in Mississippi, he rode the rails to Chicago during the Great Depression and became the primary blues songwriter and producer for Chess Records. "Willie Dixon is the man who changed the style of the blues in Chicago," proclaimed fellow bluesman Johnny Shines, as quoted in Guitar Player. "As a songwriter and producer, that man [was] a genius. Yes, sir."


HeavyMetal Is The Law

esther phillips

Category: By the bug


One of the deepest soul sets from Esther Phillips' 70s years on Kudu Records -- a set with some nicely gritty grooves and a surprisingly earthy feel at times -- especially when compared to some of her other albums of the time! Backings are by James Brown's old reedman, Pee Wee Ellis -- and although there's some of the usual Kudu electric funk in the mix, there's also some deeper soul elements too -- a vibe that's often a bit laidback and open, almost more Atlantic Records at points -- which is a mighty good fit for Esther's wonderful voice! As usual for Kudu, the players are an all-star lineup -- one that includes Richard Tee on keyboards, George Benson on guitar, Maceo Parker on tenor, and Bernard Purdie and Billy Cobham on drums -- and Don Sebesky's also on deck a bit, to sweeten a few tracks up with light strings. The album's got a great version of Bill Withers' "Use Me" that features a tasty break in the intro -- and other titles include a great version of "Alone Again (Naturally)", plus the cuts "Let's Move & Groove", "Cherry Red", "Let Me In Your Life", and "You & Me Together".


otis redding

Category: By the bug


Otis Redding's third album, and his first fully realized album, presents his talent unfettered, his direction clear, and his confidence emboldened, with fully half the songs representing a reach that extended his musical grasp. More than a quarter of this album is given over to Redding's versions of songs by Sam Cooke, his idol, who had died the previous December, and all three are worth owning and hearing. Two of them, "A Change Is Gonna Come" and "Shake," are every bit as essential as any soul recordings ever made, and while they (and much of this album) have reappeared on several anthologies, it's useful to hear the songs from those sessions juxtaposed with each other, and with "Wonderful World," which is seldom compiled elsewhere. Also featured are Redding's spellbinding renditions of "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction" (a song epitomizing the fully formed Stax/Volt sound and which Mick Jagger and Keith Richards originally wrote in tribute to and imitation of Redding's style), "My Girl," and "You Don't Miss Your Water." "Respect" and "I've Been Loving You Too Long," two originals that were to loom large in his career, are here as well; the former became vastly popular in the hands of Aretha Franklin and the latter was an instant soul classic. Among the seldom-cited jewels here is a rendition of B.B. King's "Rock Me Baby" that has the singer sharing the spotlight with Steve Cropper, his playing alternately elegant and fiery, with Wayne Jackson and Gene "Bowlegs" Miller's trumpets and Andrew Love's and Floyd Newman's saxes providing the backing. Redding's powerful, remarkable singing throughout makes Otis Blue gritty, rich, and achingly alive, and an essential listening experience.


Acte Vide

Category: By the bug

Acte Vide is an open-ended duo project. It consists of a series of improvised sessions that happen spontaneously and at intermittent periods, and involve mainly piano and laptop, but extend to voice, percussion, and any found object in sight.

Acte Vide is also a constant circle of reactivity between two sound sources, two personalities, and two lives. We tend to move around a lot and have often spent long periods of time separated by considerable geographical distance. Our sessions are intimate and concentrated, and they are treated and documented as one-off performances, usually relying on very basic home recording set-ups, with virtually no editing.

Le Nouveau Sans Frontières (Live at Cafe Oto) [2009]

or download it directly from Acte Vide's Webpage



Category: By the bug

Lodestar were formed in 1996 by Heitham Al-Sayed (Lead Vocalist), John Morgan(Drums) and "Haggis" (Bass/Sound Engineer) after they left Senser.



Eddie Gale

Category: By the bug

''It is often difficult to gauge the relative importance or message of an artwork, years or decades after its initial release. Truly impressive are those works that not only retain their Zeitgeist, the spirit of the times, but also find relevance and significance with the present. Listening to the re-release of 1968's Eddie Gale's Ghetto Music, one not only senses the social awakening of the late 1960s, there is an equal and unfortunate awareness of our current cultural waste. Francis Wolff, co-founder of Blue Note, felt so strongly about this album that he personally financed the production and release of this music in 1968, after recording Gale on Cecil Taylor's Unit Structures and Larry Young's Of Love and Peace.

Along with its companion piece, Black Rhythm Happening, Eddie Gale's Ghetto Music fell victim to the chaos following Liberty Records' takeover of Blue Note. Both pieces never appeared beyond their initial releases, until now.

The good people at San Francisco-based Water Music have taken the initiative and re-released Eddie Gale's Ghetto Music on CD. The success of the album stems from its unique use of folk, blues, gospel, soul and jazz to create a wildly vibrant, urban force. "The Rain," with Joan Gale's soft, assured delivery, sets the pace for the entire album, as it morphs from a single guitar strum into a massive entity of sound, rhythm, and swing. Surprising, since 17 musicians appear on the album, is the precision and efficiency of the music.

On "Fulton Street," for example, the feel of the famous Brooklyn street is captured immediately by the child-like voices pronouncing its name proudly: "Fulton Street, baby!" Then, the low down riff comes in, the singers mimic the sound of the horns, they interchange riffs, and someone runs here, somebody else goes there, and you feel it, you're on Fulton Street, baby. It welcomes you.

Once in, it may well be difficult to relinquish the sensation of songs like "A Walk With Thee" or "The Coming of Gwilu." Both burn as deep, groove as hard, as anything else on the vaunted Blue Note catalog. For that reason, those that rarely venture outside the hard bop fringes of Blue Note will be most rewarded by the music here, as it presents new possibilities without abandoning the "Blue Note sound." ''

Ghetto Music